Featured

10 Fruits and Vegetables in Season For Fall to Add to Your Plate

Seasonal eating is fresh, fun, and better for the environment. Add these fruits and vegetables in season for fall to your next shopping list!

What is your favorite thing about fall? I love the leaves changing, the cozy weather, and the fall activities. I also adore fall produce! I’m so ready for warming meals filled with the fruits and vegetables in season now.

Benefits of Eating Seasonally

  • Saves money. Seasonal produce is less expensive than out of season fruits and vegetables at the grocery store, because it is more plentiful.
  • Tastes better. Produce that is in season simply tastes better. If you’ve eaten a tomato in the middle of January, then you know what I mean!
    Adds variety to your diet. It is important to have variety in your diet, because different foods have different nutrients and benefits. If you eat seasonally, you are naturally adding variety to your diet as the seasons change.
  • Better for the environment. You’ll reduce your carbon footprint by choosing seasonal produce, because there was less energy used to grow and transport the food to your store. Bonus points if you shop at your local farmer’s market!
  • Less pesticide use. Foods grown out of season need a lot more assistance in the form of pesticides and chemicals to grow. Fruits and vegetables that grow naturally in fall weather conditions are easier to produce with less assistance.

Fruits and Vegetables In Season for Fall

Here is a list of 10 fruits and vegetables in season right now! You’ll also find recipes to inspire you to get into the kitchen.

Apples

Apple cinnamon coffee cake - Daisybeet

Apple picking is a quintessential fall activity, and it is dietitian approved! Apples contain fiber, vitamin C, and antioxidants. Make sure to eat the skin, though, as it holds most of the fiber and antioxidants!

Make this apple cinnamon coffee cake, five-minute bircher muesli, or this kale salad with apple, cranberries, and pecans by Deb Perelman, by way of Cookie and Kate.

Beets

Beets - fruits and vegetables in season - Daisybeet

Beets are one of the healthiest foods to eat. Not only do they contain several vitamins and minerals, beets have nitrates and pigments (that give them their beautiful color). These compounds have several health benefits. The nitrates in beets convert to nitric oxide in the body, which dilates our blood vessels, temporarily lowering blood pressure. The pigments in beets have antioxidant effects that may reduce inflammation.

Try this beet and goat cheese salad with wild rice and chickpeas, dreamy pink beet + white bean dip, and these baked zucchini, beet, and sweet potato fritters.

Broccoli

Broccoli - fruits and vegetables in season - Daisybeet

Broccoli might just be my all time favorite vegetable. It is part of the cruciferous vegetable family, which also includes Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, and kale. In addition to fiber, vitamin C, iron, and potassium, broccoli has phytonutrients that lower inflammation and may help lower the risk of cancer.

Roast up a tray of this addicting lemon parmesan broccoli, try this broccoli salad with Thai peanut dressing, or this easy pasta and broccoli recipe by Skinnytaste.

Brussels Sprouts

Roasted fall vegetable kale and quinoa salad - Daisybeet

Brussels sprouts had a bad rap for a while, but they are absolutely delicious when roasted to crispy perfection. They share similar health benefits to broccoli, as they contain the same phytonutrients. Also, Brussels sprouts are an excellent source of vitamins C and K.

This kale quinoa salad with fall roasted vegetables contains Brussels sprouts. These crispy roasted Brussels sprouts by Chelsea’s Messy Apron look insane!

Cauliflower

Cauliflower - fruits and vegetables in season - Daisybeet

Cauliflower – the trendiest vegetable of our time. It’s been transformed into pizza crust, gnocchi, and rice because of it’s neutral flavor. But cauliflower is delicious in it’s natural whole form, too! It is a perfect neutral palate to experiment with lots of flavors. Cauliflower is high in fiber, vitamins C and K, and antioxidants.

I have a bunch of cauliflower recipes on the blog, so here is a little list:

Kale

Kale is a hardy green, so it holds up to the falling temperatures in the fall, which softer greens can’t handle. It’s a super nutrient dense food, and is loaded with nutrients including vitamins A, C, and K. Also, kale is a good plant-based source of calcium.

Tis the season to load up on all the kale salads! Try my favorite dairy free kale caesar salad, this Greek kale salad by Gimme Delicious, and this kale salad with carrot ginger dressing by Love & Lemons.

Pears

Hasselback baked pear oatmeal - Daisybeet

Pears are another in season fruit for the cooler months. They contain both soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber is a prebiotic, feeding the good bacteria in our guts! Just like apples, the pear skin contains most of the fiber.

Try my hasselback baked pears on oatmeal for a delicious breakfast. I also love to roast pears with beets and sweet potatoes for a dinner side!

Pumpkin

Pumpkin alfredo sauce - Daisybeet

Pumpkin is a versatile and nutritious ingredient that is in season for fall. It can be used in both sweet and savory recipes. Pumpkin is a good source of fiber. It is also rich in beta-carotene, an antioxidant that makes pumpkin orange, and benefits eye and skin health.

This vegan pumpkin alfredo sauce is one of my favorite pumpkin recipes to make in the fall! Also, try these healthier pumpkin muffins by Gimme Some Oven, or these pumpkin pancakes by Well Plated.

Squash

Butternut squash tacos - Daisybeet

You’ve probably seen lots of winter squash varieties showing up in your grocery stores and farmer’s markets. From butternut to delicata, winter squashes are abundant this time of year. They are a versatile ingredient – turn them into soups, curries, or mash them like potatoes. Winter squashes are rich in fiber, vitamin C, potassium, and carotenoid antioxidants.

Here are some of my favorite ways to prepare winter squash:

Sweet Potato

Sweet potato - Daisybeet

Last but not least, sweet potatoes are a favorite fall tuber. Sweet potatoes are slightly higher in fiber than white potatoes, and they are higher in vitamins A, B6, and C. I love roasted sweet potato wedges as a side with dinner!

Try these sweet potato toasts with Mediterranean salsa, Mexican stuffed sweet potatoes, and this sweet potato casserole by Joy Food Kitchen.

Let me know if you love this post by leaving a comment below, and check out Instagram and Pinterest for more healthy lifestyle inspiration. Thanks for stopping by!

Save this post for later to one of your Pinterest boards

Pinterest graphic - Daisybeet
Featured

Healthier Apple Cinnamon Coffee Cake (Gluten Free)

This apple cinnamon coffee cake is a better-for-you autumn treat! It’s gluten free, lower in sugar, and sure to please everyone.

Healthier apple cinnamon coffee cake - Daisybeet

I love apple based baked goods in the fall when apples are in season. There is nothing cozier than the smell of warm apples and cinnamon in the oven! Apple pie, apple crisp, apple cobbler…I’ll take them all!

This apple cinnamon coffee cake is a twist on classic coffee cake. The two are similar in their quick bread “cake” base and delicious streusel topping. But, this version is a little more unique!

Healthier apple cinnamon coffee cake - Daisybeet

First, there is lemon zest in the cake batter, which adds such a delicious and light flavor. Also, you’ll layer sliced apples underneath the cinnamon streusel topping. The apples get so soft and sweet when they bake! I used Mac apples from Yes! Apples – they came straight from the orchards in New York. This variety is perfectly sweet and tart, and great for baking.

Healthier apple cinnamon coffee cake - Daisybeet

What makes this apple cinnamon coffee cake healthier?

  • No butter. We replaced butter with applesauce and non-fat plain Greek style yogurt in this recipe. This significantly cuts back on the saturated fat content in this treat.
  • Gluten free. This recipe is perfectly safe for those with a gluten allergy or intolerance! Almond flour stands in for regular white flour. It provides more protein, healthy fats, and fiber than refined white flour. The healthy fats and fiber in almond flour prevent the sugars in your treat from being absorbed too quickly into the blood, so it is better for blood sugar levels.
  • Lower added sugar. This recipe calls for 3/4 cup of total added sugars: 1/2 cup of maple syrup in the cake, and 1/4 cup of brown sugar in the streusel topping. This is much less than the sugar content in traditional coffee cake recipes!
Layered apples - Daisybeet

How to make apple cinnamon coffee cake

  • Prepare cake batter and pour into a baking pan.
  • Thinly slice apples and layer them on top of the cake batter.
  • Prepare the streusel topping and sprinkle over the apples.
  • Bake for 45 minutes – 1 hour.
Healthier apple cinnamon coffee cake - Daisybeet

If you love this recipe, you may also like

Let me know if you love this recipe by leaving a comment or rating below, and check out Instagram and Pinterest for more healthy lifestyle inspiration. Thanks for stopping by!

Print

Healthier Apple Cinnamon Coffee Cake (Gluten Free)

  • Author: Alex
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 minutes – 1 hour
  • Total Time: -5 minute
  • Yield: 16 1x
  • Category: dessert, breakfast

Description

This apple cinnamon coffee cake is a better-for-you autumn treat! It’s gluten free, lower in sugar, and sure to please everyone.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups almond flour
  • 1/2 tsp Kosher salt
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1/2 cup non-fat plain Greek style yogurt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 2 Yes! Apples Mac apples, thinly sliced

Streusel topping

  • 3 tsp cinnamon
  • 3 tbsp coconut oil, solid
  • 1/2 cup almond flour
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line an 8″x8″ baking dish with parchment paper.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, mix together almond flour, salt, and baking soda.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together applesauce, yogurt, eggs, maple syrup, vanilla, and lemon zest until well combined with no lumps.
  4. Pour wet ingredients into dry, and mix together. 
  5. Pour cake batter into the prepared baking dish. 
  6. Layer apple slices evenly over the cake batter. 
  7. Use a fork to mash together all the streusel topping ingredients in a bowl. Mixture should be crumbly.
  8. Use your hands to sprinkle the streusel topping evenly over the apple slices.
  9. Bake for 45 minutes – 1 hour, until cake is not jiggy when moved, and a toothpick comes out clean in the center. Edges will be nicely browned to a deep caramel color. 
  10. Let cool completely before slicing into 16 squares. 


Notes

  • Store in an airtight container for up to 1 week. 

Keywords: apple cinnamon coffee cake, healthy coffee cake, apple cinnamon, gluten free baking, gluten free, almond flour

Save this recipe for later to one of your Pinterest boards

Pinterest Graphic - Daisybeet

Thank you Yes! Apples for sponsoring this blog post! I’m grateful to partner with brands I love to cook with, and all opinions are my own.

Featured

Health Benefits of a High Fiber Diet + High Fiber Foods to Eat Today

Fiber is one of the most important nutrients to consume. Learn all about the health benefits of dietary fiber and the difference between soluble and insoluble fiber in today’s post, including a list of delicious foods to include in a high fiber diet!

Fiber is one of the most important nutrients for our diet, but it does not get the attention it deserves. Fiber is certainly less glamorous than other trendy nutrients, as it might evoke images of your grandparents sipping on metamucil. But, the benefits of fiber go so beyond keeping us regular! I’m all in for making fiber the coolest nutrient, and I hope you will be too after reading this post.

What is Dietary Fiber?

Dietary fiber is the indigestible part of plants that we consume when we eat fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. Unlike the macro and micronutrients, our bodies are unable to digest and absorb fiber, so it passes through our digestive system intact.

Soluble vs. Insoluble Fiber

There are two types of dietary fiber: soluble and insoluble. They each have unique health benefits. A high fiber diet should include sources of both types to get maximum benefits.

  • Soluble fiber dissolves in water, so it forms a gel in our digestive tract when we eat it. Because of this, it can bind to cholesterol in our bodies to help lower cholesterol levels. Good sources of soluble fiber include oats, beans, flaxseeds, barley, and apples.
  • Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water, so it speeds up digestion and increases stool bulk. Good sources of insoluble fiber include nuts, cauliflower, whole wheat products, Brussels sprouts, and raspberries.

Health Benefits of a High Fiber Diet

  • Keeps us regular. Fiber, especially insoluble fiber, speeds up digestion and increases stool bulk. This helps prevent constipation and diarrhea to keep our bowels healthy and regular.
  • Weight management. High fiber foods are very filling, and lower in calories than other foods. Including many high fiber foods in our diets can promote healthy weight management.
  • Lower cholesterol levels. Soluble fiber forms a gel like substance in our bodies, which binds to “bad” LDL cholesterol to rid it from our bodies. Soluble fiber may also help improve other lipid markers (1).
  • Controls blood sugar levels. Fiber, especially soluble fiber, helps slow the absorption of blood sugar when we eat. Studies show that soluble fiber intake can reduce HbA1C, fasting blood glucose, and insulin resistance in people with Type 2 Diabetes (2).
  • Promotes gut health. The good bacteria that live in our guts depend on fermentable dietary products as a source of energy so they can be healthy and grow. Fiber from our diets feeds these good bacteria, so a high fiber diet promotes probiotic health, abundance, and diversity. Healthy gut bacteria also produce short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which have their own health benefits such as reduced inflammation and reduced risk of chronic disease (3).
  • Reduced risk of chronic disease. High fiber diets are naturally high in plant foods, so they also come with lots of other amazing vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants to help prevent chronic disease, such as cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, and Type 2 Diabetes.

Dietary Fiber Recommendations

The dietary fiber recommendations are 25 grams per day for women and 38 grams per day for men. For women and men over 50, these numbers drop to 21 grams and 30 grams, respectively. For reference, one half cup of black beans has about 8 grams of fiber, one cup of shredded wheat contains about 5 grams, and one half cup of raspberries has 4 grams (4). As you can see, you need to eat multiple portions of fiber rich foods (i.e. plant foods) throughout the day to meet the recommendations.

One reason why many Americans are not meeting their daily fiber needs is because the standard American diet is low in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes. There are plenty of fiber supplements out there, but they are devoid of many of the other health benefits that come with plant foods, like vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Plus, fiber from supplements may not be as filling as fiber from plant foods.

High Fiber Foods to Add to Your Diet

Now, the fun part! This list is by no means exhaustive, but here are some of my favorite high fiber foods to enjoy daily. There are also some yummy recipes to give you inspiration to add more fiber to your diet!

Oatmeal

Contains 4 grams of fiber per 1 cup cooked oats. Try this Cacao Banana Oatmeal or Banana Baked Oatmeal with Peanut Butter and Chocolate Chips for an easy breakfast!

cacao banana oatmeal

Quinoa

Quinoa contains 2.6 grams of fiber per half cup. These Quinoa Enchilada Stuffed Peppers or this Moroccan Quinoa Salad from Choosing Chia would be perfect to add to your dinner menu!

quinoa stuffed peppers

Whole Wheat Pasta

Swap out white pasta for whole wheat, and you’ll get 3.2 grams of fiber per half cup serving! Some of my favorite whole wheat pasta dishes are this Spring Pasta with Lemon, Asparagus, Mushrooms, and Peas, and this Pasta Salad with Roasted Vegetables and Tuna.

high fiber diet pasta salad

Kale

One cup of kale has 2.6 grams of fiber. Even more reason to keep up your kale caesar habit! Check out this dairy free version, this Kale Cobb Salad from Dishing out Health, and this Rose Pasta with Asparagus and Kale from The First Mess to get your kale on!

kale caesar salad

Sweet Potato

One medium sweet potato has almost 4 grams of fiber. Make sure you’re eating the skin, though, as this is where most of the fiber (and other nutrients) lives! These Mexican Stuffed Sweet Potatoes are a favorite of mine, and I’ve been dying to try these Grilled Sweet Potato Wedges by Mad About Food!

mexican stuffed sweet potato high fiber diet

Chickpeas

Chickpeas, or garbanzo beans, are an excellent source of plant based protein and fiber. One half cup contains 8 grams! Fill up on this Chickpea and Roasted Vegetable Salad, Loaded Greek Hummus for a Crowd, or Chickpea and Avocado Stuffed Sweet Potatoes.

chickpea and roasted vegetable salad

Black Beans

Black beans pack 7.5 grams of fiber per one half cup. Try out this delicious mango avocado salsa over my Mushroom Tacos, or this Black Bean Tomato Avocado Salad by Little Spice Jar.

mango avocado black bean salsa

White Beans

Are you guys picking up on a bean trend here? White beans are also a good source of fiber. One half cup will give you 5.7 grams! I love to make this Dreamy Pink Beet and White Bean Dip for dipping, and this Tuscan White Bean and Kale Soup from Kristine’s Kitchen sounds so cozy.

white bean dip

Lentils

I love lentils of all kinds. One half cup has almost 8 grams of fiber. This Coconut Curry Red Lentil Soup is one of my favorites. Also, check out this Lemony Lentil Soup by Gimme Some Oven.

coconut curry red lentil soup

Apples

One medium apple has about 4.5 grams of fiber. I love to put sautéed apples in my morning oatmeal and munch on apple nachos as a healthy snack.

apple nachos

Pears

Pears have even more fiber than apples. One pear has almost 6 grams of fiber! Some of my favorite pear recipes are Hasselback Baked Pears and Ginger Roasted Beets, Sweet Potatoes, and Pears.

hasselback baked pear

Chia Seeds

Last but not least, chia seeds are a really excellent dietary fiber source. One tablespoon has a 4 grams! Try this Blended Chocolate Chia Pudding or this Dreamy Coconut Chia Pudding with Blueberries from The Wooden Skillet.

chocolate chia pudding

High fiber diets are super healthy, because as you can see, they include lots of fruits, veggies, whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds. If you’re increasing your fiber intake, make sure to also drink plenty of water, because fiber digests better with water. What is your favorite way to get more fiber in your diet?

Let me know if you love this post by leaving a comment below, and check out Instagram and Pinterest for more healthy lifestyle inspiration.

Save this post for later to one of your Pinterest boards

high fiber diet pinterest graphic

Cinnamon Sourdough French Toast with Sautéed Cinnamon Apples

What’s on your Fall To-Do List? Things I want to accomplish this season include apple picking, drinking tea, lots of baking, reducing clutter in my home and making warming breakfasts on chilly mornings. You guys know I usually love to have a hot bowl of oatmeal, and I couldn’t tell you the last time I had French toast. It seems to be a bit overshadowed by pancakes and waffles these days! I wanted to give this old-school recipe a grown up, healthy makeover. My only stipulation was that the toast slices had to be THICK.

I used my favorite whole wheat sourdough for the bread in this recipe. I love this bread because 1) it contains whole wheat flour, which is rich in nutrients like magnesium, zinc, B-vitamins and fiber, and 2) the sourdough fermentation process reduces phytic acid levels, which therefore allows these important nutrients to be more easily absorbed. I also replaced regular dairy milk with Elmhurst's new Unsweetened Milked Walnuts™. Elmhurst® has become my favorite milk alternative to use for all my recipes. Their unsweetened varieties have just 2 ingredients – nuts and water! This is hard to find, as a majority of milk alternatives on the shelves these days contain added gums and stabilizers. Elmhurst’s unsweetened varieties are the closest thing to homemade, and I feel good about putting them in my body. If you’d like to try Elmhurst, you can find many of their products at Whole Foods, and here is their store locator. You can also have any of their varieties delivered right to your door when you order off their website!

This French toast was a rich, decadent treat on a chilly fall morning, but I felt good about eating it because of the ingredients I chose! The sautéed cinnamon apples really took this stack to the next level - don’t leave them out!

Ingredients

Apples

  • 1 ½ medium Honeycrisp apples, chopped
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tsp butter, ghee or cooking oil of choice

French Toast

  • 1 cup Elmhurst Unsweetened Milked Walnuts
  • 1 egg
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp pure maple syrup
  • Dash of kosher salt
  • 5 slices of whole wheat sourdough bread, sliced about 1 inch thick
  • 2-3 tbsp butter, ghee or cooking oil of choice

Instructions

  1. Heat butter or oil for apples over medium heat in a cast iron skillet. Add apples and cinnamon, stirring occasionally until soft. Remove from heat and set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, heat a separate large skillet on medium heat with 1 tbsp butter or oil.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together Milked Walnuts, egg, cinnamon, maple syrup and salt. Transfer to a shallow dish.
  4. Working in batches as not to crowd the skillet, soak both sides of bread slices. Cook each side for 3-5 minutes until nicely browned and tender. Flip and cook for an additional 2 minutes. Add more butter/oil as needed between batches.
  5. Serve stack of French toast topped with cinnamon apples, a drizzle of maple syrup and nut butter (optional, but extra delicious).

This recipe serves 2-3 depending on how big the slices of toast are. It kept me full for hours! If you guys try this recipe, tag @Elmhurst1925 and @daisybeet on Instagram 🙂